10 Países em direção a uma economia quase sem dinheiro

10 Most Cashless Countries in the World (2015)
Leaders in the mobile wallet trend
The cashless society is in full swing.


Certain start-ups threaten to make ATMs obsolete, Apple's making a big bet on mobile payments, and American Express's CEO even declared that he doesn't fear the potential demise of plastic. Current trends seemingly point to a future with increasingly less cash floating around.

For certain countries, however, that future is close to becoming a reality, as a number of nations have shifted almost entirely toward nonphysical payment.

Based on the rate of cash-free transactions and the percent of the population that relies on a debit card, here is a look at the 10 countries leading the pack toward a nearly cashless economy.

10. South Korea


Noncash payments' share of total value of consumer payments: 70 percent
Percent of population with a debit card: 58 percent
South Korea might have been higher on the list, but societal and governmental initiatives that seek to reign in household debt by reducing usage of credit cards have pegged it down to number 10.


9. Germany

Noncash payments' share of total value of consumer payments: 76 percent
Percent of population with a debit card: 88 percent
Munich's Oktoberfest, long known for dirndls, lederhosen and tipsy American tourists gaping at the people wearing them, has become a more expensive proposition in recent years: A liter of beer ran revelers around 10 Euros this fall.
A minor consolation may be that partyers don't have to carry loads of cash to pay for their inevitable binges: Starting in 2012, merchants needed only an iPhone and an EMV chip reader (which is plugged into the phone) to accept credit or debit card payments, using technology from the Munich-based company payworks.


8. United States
The Google Mobile Wallet app for cardless payments is displayed on a smartphone screen at the Mobile World Congress.
Noncash payments' share of total value of consumer payments: 80 percent
Percent of population with a debit card: 72 percent
The simmering shift to electronic payments has boiled over in the past few months, with Apple announcing its new "Wallet" service and introducing, along with Microsoft and other tech companies, electronic watches with payment capabilities.
American Express CEO Ken Chenault declared that he didn't fear the demise of plastic cards; even ATMs run the risk of becoming obsolete in coming years.

7. The Netherlands
Noncash payments' share of total value of consumer payments: 85 percent
Percent of population with a debit card: 98 percent
Driving into Amsterdam? Make sure you have a credit or debit card on you; the city's parking meters no longer accept cash or coins.
A number of retailers and restaurants in the city also refuse to take cash; Dutch customers have taken such policies in stride, with 75 percent of them understanding and accepting of no-cash rules.

6. Australia

Noncash payments' share of total value of consumer payments: 86 percent
Percent of population with a debit card: 79 percent
If a relative is taking "No Shave November" a little too seriously, it may help to turn them on to another trend that may be beginning to catch on: No Cash November, launched by Australian billionaire Andrew "Twiggy" Forrest in his home country.
Unfortunately, however, there's no reason why somebody can't both not shave and not use cash.

5. Sweden
A worker demonstrates Apple Pay inside a mobile kiosk sponsored by Visa and Wells Fargo.
Noncash payments' share of total value of consumer payments: 89 percent
Percent of population with a debit card: 96 percent
Bank robberies in Sweden plunged from 110 in 2008 to only 16 in 2011, the lowest level since the country started recording its numbers in the early 1970s.
The reason? Swedish banks are carrying less cash than ever before. There's often nothing for would-be thieves to steal.

4. United Kingdom
Noncash payments' share of total value of consumer payments: 89 percent
Percent of population with a debit card: 88 percent
Before you step on one of those famous double-decker buses in London, make sure that you have an "Oyster Card" or a prepaid ticket on you. 
From July 6, city buses stopped accepting cash as a valid payment. Still, it's doubtful that too many Londoners will care; only 1 percent of commuters used cash in 2014, compared to 25 percent in 2000.

3. Canada

Noncash payments' share of total value of consumer payments: 90 percent
Percent of population with a debit card: 88 percent
If you're from a border town like Buffalo or Detroit, at some point you've probably rummaged in your pocket for a few pennies, only to find that one or more of your coins is emblazoned with Queen Elizabeth instead of Abraham Lincoln.

That scenario is about to become a lot more unlikely; starting in February 2013, Canada stopped minting and distributing pennies, supposedly saving the country $11 million a year.

2. France
Noncash payments' share of total value of consumer payments: 92 percent
Percent of population with a debit card: 69 percent
If you live in France, are saving up to buy a new car (perhaps a Citroën), and keep all of your money under your mattress, we have some bad news for you: The country has disallowed any cash transactions over 3000 Euro.
You can still buy a car using cash from a friend, but if you're paying them more than 1,500 euro, you legally need a bill to prove payment.

1. Belgium

Noncash payments' share of total value of consumer payments: 93 percent
Percent of population with a debit card: 86 percent
Belgium has a law similar to France's with regard to limiting cash payments to 3,000 euro. Belgium's law goes a step further, however: It could charge up to 225,000 euros for a violation.


Perhaps the 14 percent of Belgians without a debit card ought to reconsider their choice.

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